Ancient Greek was not only the mother tongue of the greatest and most foundational extra-Biblical literature (Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, and Hippocrates; Plato and Pindar; Aristotle and Aristophanes; Euclid and Euripides; Sophocles and Strabo; Demosthenes and Dio), but it served as the Scriptures’ medium with which “the Nations”, Gentiles, or non-Jews, were evangelized. From there, the Apostolic Fathers, wholly, and many of the Church Fathers [re-]created genres that remain with us today (apologias and tracts, letter-writing and textual commentaries, celebratory and funeral orations).  

Latin and Greek are unique: they are the sole two languages to be used continuously, for nearly two millennia (or more, in the case of Greek), in Christians liturgies and in scholarly debates of every matter under the sun.  In sometimes shrinking and occasionally increasing territories, Latin and Greek – more than any other languages – have been used in the most human and divine undertaking: logos, communication of rational and super-rational ideas and realities. – Dr. Jonathan Arrington, Greek and Latin teacher


CLASSICAL GREEK & LATIN – FROM HOMER TO HODIERN – LATIN AND GREEK FOR 5TH-12TH GRADERS

NOW OPEN FOR FALL 2018 ENROLLMENT

Classes Start September 4, 2018

Ancient Greek was not only the mother tongue of the greatest and most foundational extra-Biblical literature (Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, and Hippocrates; Plato and Pindar; Aristotle and Aristophanes; Euclid and Euripides; Sophocles and Strabo; Demosthenes and Dio), but it served as the Scriptures’ medium with which “the Nations”, Gentiles, or non-Jews, were evangelized. From there, the Apostolic Fathers, wholly, and many of the Church Fathers [re-]created genres that remain with us today (apologias and tracts, letter-writing and textual commentaries, celebratory and funeral orations).  

Pacific Standard Time  Eastern Standard Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday  
12:00PM-1:00PM 3:00PM-4:00PM Greek 1 Greek 1 Greek 1 Greek 1
11:00AM-12:00PM 2:00PM-3:00PM Latin 2 Latin 2 Latin 2 Latin 2
2:00PM-3:00PM 5:00PM-6:00PM Latin 1 Latin 1 Latin 1 Latin 1
1:00PM-2:00PM 4:00PM-5:00PM Latin

Reading(A)

Latin

Reading(B)

Greek

Reading(A)

Greek

Reading(B)

 

Latin and Greek are unique: they are the sole two languages to be used continuously, for nearly two millennia (or more, in the case of Greek), in Christians liturgies and in scholarly debates of every matter under the sun.  In sometimes shrinking and occasionally increasing territories, Latin and Greek – more than any other languages – have been used in the most human and divine undertaking: logos, communication of rational and super-rational ideas and realities. – Dr. Jonathan Arrington, Greek and Latin teacher

Here is the Fall 2018, Latin & Greek Class schedule [See Academic Calendar for Holidays]:

These classes are live, 60 minute, online classes and meet four times per week, for thirty (30) weeks per academic year (the same academic schedule as the rest of the Angelicum live classes).  Each class fulfills the entire Greats Honors Program foreign language requirement.

The students will learn to understand the language by listening and looking, and they will learn to respond appropriately in word – written and spoken. Grammar will be presented and mastered in manageable amounts. The students will be part of the Great Conversation – literally, or, in the target language – by learning to converse about the quotidian as well as the sublime, under the guiding hand of the greatest Poets, Dramatists, Comedians, Homelists, Historians, and Jurists. These Latin and Greek classes will put into effect Dr. John Senior’s suggestions for Latin-learning, in conjunction with TPRS and CI.

MEET THE PROFESSOR: After he left, he pursued doctoral studies in Patristic Theology at the Augustinianum, in Rome, Italy. He has sung Church Slavonic in the choir at Sant’Antonio l’abate Russian Byzantine Catholic Church in Rome for most of the last seven years. He also worked as a translator for l’Osservatore Romano, and translated documents from various modern languages into Latin for officials at the CDF, Roman Rota, and Apostolic Signatura. Finally and most enjoyably, he taught History, Theology, Latin, and Greek in Rome for Christendom College, homas

PRESENT & PLANNED CLASSES

LATIN:

SPQR 1 In Principio: The Latin Language for the Un-immersed -Beginning Latin.
SPQR 2 In Medias Res: The Latin Language for the Initiated – Intermediate Beginner’s Latin
SPQR 3 Estote Perfecti: The Latin Language for Excellence
Latin Reading Course (both Sections, A & B)
Latin Reading Course (Section A only)
Latin Reading Course (Section B only)

enrollnow1

 

 

GREEK:

Greek 1 From Homer to Hieratic: Beginning Epic and Ecclesial Greek.
Greek 2 The Heights of Hellas: Intermediate-advanced Greek.
Greek Reading Course (both Sections, A & B)
Greek Reading Course (Section A only – Wednesdays)
Greek Reading Course (Section B only – Thursdays)

enrollnow1

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Greek 1- from Homer to Hieratic: Beginning Epic and Ecclesial Greek

Course Description and Method: In this course we shall read through an adapted version of A Greek Boy at Home as well as some texts from Luigi Miraglia’s Athenaze series, and we’ll complete the accompanying exercises and use some of the auxiliary materials. Students will hear and use Greek, but may ask questions in English (the professor will then render those questions into simple Greek and respond in the Greek which the students will have learned already). There will be a brief weekly memorization assignment (to be rendered orally or in writing, at the student’s choice), comparable in difficulty to the texts which we shall read.

Expectations: students will demonstrate: 1) a commitment to attend classes or to watch all classes missed. If a student must miss a class, a recorded version will be sent promptly. 2) a willingness to learn, distinguish, and reproduce three of the commonest forms of pronunciation of Ancient Greek: Erasmian-Restored; Koine-Buth; and Ecclesiastical-Modern. 3) the completion of daily and weekly exercises, which require 10 minutes and 30-60 minutes, respectively, outside the scheduled class times. 4) memorization of material which will then be either recited/sung or written, as the student chooses; also, the student may both recite and and write to receive some extra credit.

Envisioned Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to understand Greek through their ears and eyes (Especially in De Anima, Book 3, Ch. 8 / 432a, as, “Hence (1) no one can learn or understand anything in the absence of sense, and (when the mind is actively aware of anything it is necessarily aware of it along with an image; for images are like sensuous contents except in that they contain no matter.”); they will also acquire the capacity to respond to questions in Classical Greek – both orally and in written form; by the end of the first semester, the student will be able to read some basic texts in Ancient Greek – with no necessity of consulting a dictionary! (including, an account of the Nativity of Our Lord [narrative-homiletic and liturgical Greek]; ancient maxims [juridical and philosophical Greek]; a few well-known phrases from the Iliad [poetic]; and a brief dialogue from Aristophanes[drama-comedic];) have a summary knowledge of essential Greek grammar. The second semester will build on this and complete the edifice.

Greek 2 – The Heights of Hellas: Intermediate-advanced Greek

Course Description: We will sharpen our comprehension of Ancient Greek and we will read excerpts from the main classical authors (Epic poets, Pindar, Plato and Aristotle, Sophocles, Xenophon, Biblical Greek, Basil the Great, the Gregories).

Expectations: Students will assist at class four days per week or will watch the videos of missed classes. They will give full attention during class and commit to circa one hour of weekend study. Envisioned Learning Outcome Students will be able to read basic un-adapted Greek without the need of a hefty Lexicon or Dictionary.

Required Reading: Excerpts, all of which will be available online or through email.

Greek Reading Course

This is not your average Greek History, Mythology, and religion course: we will read these works or the listed excerpts, but we will then discuss them in simpler Greek, We will learn and discuss the appropriate “scholiast” and grammatical terms for the passages – which is itself a sort of dialect that opens the doors to many Medieval works. We shall also note the distinctions between corresponding Christian and pre-Christian vocabulary for historical events and for religious postures and practices. The middle 50 minutes will be in the target language: the first and final five minutes of each class are open to discussions and questions in English. Students may enroll for one or both Greek reading sections (A and B, or just A or B).
Greek Readings A & B:

Greek A (Wednesday- Classical Authors) Aristotle’s De Anima and Polybius’ History, Books 1-3;
Greek B (Thursday- Christian Authors) Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History (1-5) and Maximos Confessor’s “On Different Difficult Passages in Scripture, Gregory and Dionysius’.

Latin I – SPQR 1 In Principio: The Latin Language for the Un-immersed-Beginning Latin

Course Description and Method:

In this course we shall read through most of Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, by Hans Ørberg, and complete the accompanying exercises and use some of the auxiliary materials. Students will hear and use Latin in the middle 50 minutes of each class, but may ask questions in English in the first five and final five minutes. There will be a brief weekly memorization assignment (to be rendered orally or in writing, at the student’s choice), comparable in difficulty to the texts which we shall read.

Expectations: students will demonstrate: 1) a commitment to attend classes or to watch all classes missed. If a student must miss a class, a recorded version will be sent promptly. 2) the completion of daily and weekly exercises, which require 10 minutes and 30-60 minutes, respectively, outside the scheduled class times. 3) memorization of material which will then be either recited/sung or written, as the student chooses; also, the student may both recite and and write to receive some extra credit.

Envisioned Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to understand Latin through their ears and eyes – although also through other senses, since nihil est in intellectu quod non sit prius in sensu (De veritate, q. 2 a. 3 arg. 19) – and this sensate knowledge will be ordered and organized into a work of art and science that will stand AMDG and ad perpetuam rei memoriam.

They will also acquire the capacity to respond to questions in Latin, both orally and in written form; by the end of the first semester, the student will be able to read some basic Latin texts (including, an account of the Nativity of Our Lord [narrative-homiletic and liturgical Latin]; ancient maxims [juridical]; a few well-known phrases from the Aeneid [poetic]; and a brief dialogue from Terence [drama-comedic]; have a summary knowledge of basic Latin grammar. The second semester will build on this and complete the edifice.

Required Readings and Resources: Lingua Latina per se Illustrata; Exercitia Latina; Colloquia personarum; texts provided by the professor and easily available online.

LATIN II – SPQR 2 In Medias Res: The Latin Language for the Initiated-Intermediate Latin

Course Description and Method:

In this course we shall read through Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, by Hans Ørberg, and complete the accompanying exercises and use some of the auxiliary materials. Students will hear and use Latin in the middle 50 minutes of each class, but may ask questions in English in the first five and final five minutes. There will be a brief weekly memorization assignment (to be rendered orally or in writing, at the student’s choice), comparable in difficulty to the texts which we shall read.

Expectations: students will demonstrate: 1) a commitment to attend classes or to watch all classes missed. If a student must miss a class, a recorded version will be sent promptly; 2) the completion of daily and weekly exercises, which require 10 minutes and 30-60 minutes, respectively, outside the scheduled class times; 3) memorization of material which will then be either recited/sung or written, as the student chooses; also, the student may both recite and and write to receive some extra credit.

Envisioned Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to understand Latin through their ears and eyes; they will also acquire the capacity to respond to questions in Latin, both orally and in written form; by the end of the first semester, the student will be able to read some intermediate Latin texts (including, an account of the Nativity of Our Lord [narrative-homiletic and liturgical Latin]; ancient maxims [juridical]; a few well-known phrases from the Aeneid [poetic]; and a brief dialogue from Terence [drama-comedic]; have a summary knowledge of basic Latin grammar.

The student will learn Latin through the eyes and ears, primarily – although also through other senses, since nihil est in intellectu quod non sit prius in sensu (De veritate, q. 2 a. 3 arg. 19) – and this sensate knowledge will be ordered and organized by the student’s agent intellect, into a work of art and science that will stand AMDG, ad perpetuam rei memoriam. The second semester will build on this and complete the edifice.

Latin Reading Course

This is not your average Roman History, Mythology, and religion course: we will read these works or the listed excerpts, but we will then discuss them in simpler Latin. We will learn and discuss the appropriate “scholiast” and grammatical terms for the passages – which is itself a sort of dialect that opens the doors to many Medieval works. We shall also note the distinctions between corresponding Christian and pre-Christian vocabulary for historical events and for religious postures and practices. The middle 50 minutes will be in the target language: the first and final five minutes of each class are open to discussions and questions in English. Students may enroll for one or both Latin reading sections (A and B, or just A or B).

Latin Readings (A & B):
Latin A (Monday-Christian Authors) Livy’s History of Rome, Books 1-3; Ovid’s Fasti
Latin B (Tuesday-Classical Authors) Vives’ De Anima and St. Augustine’s De Civitate Dei

TUITION
Greek I and II courses and Latin I, II and III courses will meet online 4 times per week (Mondays-Thursdays), for live, one hour (60 minute) classes, for thirty (30) weeks per academic year (120 hours – only about $16 per hour per student), beginning the first week of September, into May. Class size will initially be limited to about 12 students. Minimum class size will be 5 students, or that class will not be conducted and any tuition received will be refunded in full.

The Greek and Latin Reading Courses will meet twice per week (not four times – see schedule above) for one hour (60 minute) classes beginning the first week of September, into May, 2019.

Each Reading courses offers one day of Classical authors, and one day per week of Christian authors. If you wish only to take one day, or the other, you may so select on the enrollment page.

COURSE MATERIALS

LATIN I – THE SERIES WE USE: Lingua Latina per se Illustrata: Hans Oerberg’s Lingua Latina per se Illustrata is the world’s premiere series for learning Latin via the Natural Method. Students first learn grammar and vocabulary intuitively through extended contextual reading and an innovative system of marginal notes. It is the only textbook currently available that gives students the opportunity to learn Latin without resorting to translation, but allows them to think in the language. It is also the most popular text for teachers, at both the secondary and collegiate levels, who wish to incorporate conversational skills into their classroom practice.

Familia Romana (Pars I of the Lingua Latina series) contains thirty-five chapters and describes the life of a Roman family in the 2nd century A.D., and culminate in readings from classical poets and Donatus’s Ars Grammatica, the standard Latin school text for a millennium. Each chapter is divided into two or three lectiones (lessons) of a couple pages each followed by a grammar section, Grammatica Latina, and three exercises or Pensa. Hans Oerberg’s impeccable Latinity, humorous stories, and the Peer Lauritzen illustrations make this work a classic. The book includes a table of inflections, a Roman calendar, and a word index, index vocabulorum.

Colloquia Personarum: An illustrated collection of supplementary texts, mostly dialogue. There is one colloquium matching each of Chapters 1-24 in Lingua Latina: Familia Romana.

Exercitia Latina: This workbook contains contains supplemental grammatical exercises for each of the 133 lectiones (lessons) in Familia Romana (Lingua Latina Pars I).

Latin II: Required Readings and Resources: Lingua Latina per se Illustrata; Exercitia Latina; two Lhomond texts: one for purchase (Epitome Historiae Sacrae) and another which the professor will provide.

These books may be purchased in the Academy Bookstore

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Greek I Required Readings and Resources: Texts will be provided by the teacher.

Greek II: Excerpts, all of which will be available online or through email.

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The Greek and Latin Reading Course selections will be available online or through email.

Students interested in more advanced Latin or Greek classes may contact the instructor to see about adding classes or individual tutoring.