Please explain how the family discount works.

2020-07-19T15:35:43+00:00

The Academy offers a 30% tuition discount for siblings enrolled in the same program or same online course, after the first student enrolled, as long as two or more siblings are enrolled in it. The first student is defined as the one with the highest tuition rate (usually the oldest sibling student).  For example, if two siblings are enrolled in the Academy home school program (which is $250 for grades 1-12), the first student would be $250, the next sibling student(s) would be $ 175, each.  Enrollment in the home school program does not entitle a sibling to the family discount [...]

Please explain how the family discount works.2020-07-19T15:35:43+00:00

May I switch from the Great Books Program high school track to the college track, or the reverse?

2020-07-18T15:09:30+00:00

Yes, at any semester or shortly after the semester begins. Any payments received will be applied to the appropriate track selected. Students who switch from the high school track to the college track or Associates degree (A.A.). track may also do the missed extra work of the latter and submit it for credit.

May I switch from the Great Books Program high school track to the college track, or the reverse?2020-07-18T15:09:30+00:00

Is the Greek Year of the Great Books Program a 9th grade class? Do older students take it?

2020-07-18T15:09:09+00:00

The Greek Year is simply the first year of the Great Books Program. We allow 9th graders/14-year-olds to take the course, which is why it is listed at 9th grade, but it could be listed at any grade above 9th as well.  After nearly two decades fr doing so, at the advice of Dr. Adler, we can confirm that 9th graders can do the course even though it has been recommended for college-level credit by the American Council for Education (ACE CREDIT). Our oldest students was 87. We have had numerous students in the higher high schools grades, college students and adults take [...]

Is the Greek Year of the Great Books Program a 9th grade class? Do older students take it?2020-07-18T15:09:09+00:00

May I take more than one level of the Great Books at the same time – the same semester?

2020-07-18T15:08:45+00:00

Yes. Since the readings are chronologically sequential, and the Greeks are foundational, the ideal way to take the entire course is first Greeks, then Romans the next year, etc., over four years. However, we do have students taking more than one level at a time. Usually they do Greeks and Romans, then the next year they do the Middle Ages and Moderns. So while for most students we recommend doing one level a year to maximize the order of discovery approach,  since each Great Book does stand-alone (part of what makes them great), we do allow students to take whatever levels they [...]

May I take more than one level of the Great Books at the same time – the same semester?2020-07-18T15:08:45+00:00

If I miss my regular class, may I attend another class the same week at a different time?

2020-07-19T15:35:55+00:00

Yes. Each level of Great Books class meets only once a week. However, as there are, for example, four Greek classes, it is possible to switch from one Greek class to the other if you wish or if circumstances make that desirable, for one week, or more, since the readings are the same (except when holidays result in a one week variation on occasion).  The classes are also recorded and may be listened to that way as well.

If I miss my regular class, may I attend another class the same week at a different time?2020-07-19T15:35:55+00:00

What subjects does the 9th-12th grade Great Books Program address?

2020-07-18T15:03:52+00:00

The Great Books largely re-integrate into one course what was so laboriously divided (dis-integrated) and taught separately in elementary grades. Analysis and synthesis are both necessary in a complete education. The Great Books run the gamut of subjects from theology (e.g. St. Thomas Aquinas), the language arts (e.g. Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare) and science (e.g., Copernicus, Einstein) to geography (Ptolemy), philosophy (Socrates, Plato, Aristotle), cartography and history (Herodotus, Thucydides), social studies (e.g., Herodotus, Gallic Wars, Freud), and even math (Euclid, Nicomachus of Gerasa). It is possible to break the Great Books courses down into some of these areas for separate grades, if [...]

What subjects does the 9th-12th grade Great Books Program address?2020-07-18T15:03:52+00:00

Do I have to buy any software or hardware for the online classes?

2020-07-19T15:36:08+00:00

Our software is supported on most of the operating systems and devices. To attend a live online session you can use one of the following devices: Laptop or desktop computers running Windows. This includes Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 10. All Apple computers running MAC OS 10.8 and above. All Android based tablets or phones running an Android version 4 and above. All iOS devices - iPhone, iPad and iPod.

Do I have to buy any software or hardware for the online classes?2020-07-19T15:36:08+00:00

How do you get the students together for the online discussions?

2020-07-19T15:36:18+00:00

The discussions are conducted over the Internet, with live audio, so the students participate through their home computers (using a WiFi connection, as do PCs and Macs) using a simple $15-20 microphone and speakers. Headphones often help if the student is attending from a location with frequent interruptions or noise.

How do you get the students together for the online discussions?2020-07-19T15:36:18+00:00

May a student begin participating in the online seminars at any time?

2020-07-18T14:58:53+00:00

Students in 3rd through 8th grades may join an online seminar group at any time, September through May. The readings that provide the basis for those discussions are not sequential – meaning that knowledge of the previous readings is not necessary for full participation in the current discussions. Because the high school and college Great Books reading/seminar program is a four-year course, with successive readings building upon the knowledge and understanding acquired during the previous readings and seminars, students normally start at the beginning of the Ancient Greek year, regardless of the age or grade level of the student. Once a [...]

May a student begin participating in the online seminars at any time?2020-07-18T14:58:53+00:00
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